ITiCSE 2018

23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018), July 2–4, 2018, Larnaca, Cyprus

Desktop Layout

Session 1C: Working Groups 1

Cloud Computing: Developing Contemporary Computer Science Curriculum for a Cloud-First Future
Derek Foster, Laurie White, Joshua Adams, D. Cenk Erdil, Harvey Hyman, Stan Kurkovsky, Majd Sakr, and Lee Stott
(University of Lincoln, UK; Google, USA; Saint Leo University, USA; Sacred Heart University, USA; University of South Florida, USA; Central Connecticut State University, USA; Carnegie Mellon University, USA; Microsoft, UK)
Publisher's Version
Abstract: Cloud Computing has gained significant momentum in the last five years and is regarded as a paradigm shift away from traditional 'silo' based computing. It is no longer seen as a niche area of technology, offering a diverse range of scalable and redundant service deployment models, including Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), and Containers-as-a-Service (CaaS). These models are applied to areas such as IoT, Cyber-Physical Systems, Social Media, Data Science, Media Streaming, Ecommerce, and Health Informatics. The growth in cloud presents challenges for companies to source expertise that securely supports their business when migrating/deploying services to the Cloud - particularly Small-Medium-Enterprises (SME) with limited resources. The UK Government recently published the Digital Skills Crisis report, identifying skill-set challenges facing industry, with a shortage in cloud skills negatively impacting business. While cloud technologies have evolved at significant pace, the development of contemporary Computer Science curriculum in the further and higher education (HE) sector has lagged behind. The challenges faced in the sector includes the training of educators, institutional gaps (software and hardware policies), regulatory constraints, and access to cloud platforms. Collectively these challenges are significant, but not insurmountable. By embedding fundamental cloud skills throughout the educator and student journey, both stakeholders will be better positioned to understand and practically apply the use of appropriate cloud services, and produce graduates that can support the needs of industry. This working group (WG) aims to: i) assess current cloud computing curricula in CS and similar programs, ii) document industry needs for in-demand cloud skills, iii) identify issues and gaps around cloud curriculum uptake, and iv) develop solutions to meet the skill demands on core Cloud Computing topics, technical skills exercises, and modules for integration with contemporary Computer Science curricula.

Authors:


Time stamp: 2019-04-24T07:56:26+02:00